Did you know the word "spirit" means "breath"?

Zen story – “No amount of thinking…”

A student watched as his master sat on the ground and rubbed a large stone with a smaller one.

Curious, he finally asked, “Master why are you rubbing that large stone so vigorously with the smaller one?”

The master looked up and said, “I am polishing the large stone with the smaller one too make a mirror.”

“But master,” the student replied, “no amount of rubbing those stones together will make a mirror.”

The master smiled and said, “Quite right! … Just as no amount of thinking will ever make you see your true nature.”


Posted: July 28th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Rumi, Word | No Comments »

Whirling in the stillness

As waves upon my head the circling curl,
so in the sacred dance weave ye and whirl.
Dance then, O heart, a whirling circle be.
Burn in this flame — is not the candle He?
Rumi

There is a way of sitting very still and being taken up into a wonderful inner whirling.

It is this inner experience, it appears, that Rumi was trying to express in all his poetry… like candles, incense, bells and gongs, stained glass windows and magnificent pillars and spires — all are merely reminiscent of a transcendent inner experience that we try to convey with physical outer expressions.  “It’s a bit like this…”

The only problem is, in the outer everything that has a beginning will have an end, and therefore all things come and go and don’t really get us where we want to be… all the way back to the beauty from which we were created.

The Real Thing, on the other hand, far exceeds our highest hopes and wishes.  We can know it but we cannot describe how beautiful Reality is, for the human mind is only a thimble to the vast ocean and cannot hold it.

To know the Forever is our birthright. Happiness grounded in what never was born and will never die is certain, regardless of our ability to physically whirl and twirl.  What is ultimately Real is accessible even for the crippled, blind or deaf.  There is a truly universal experience that has no limits — anyone can have it all, always, regardless of personal circumstances.

Then Jesus answering said unto them,
Go your way, and tell John what things ye have seen and heard;
how that the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed,
the deaf hear, the dead are raised, to the poor the gospel is preached.

It is beyond the body.


Posted: July 19th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Happiness, Knowledge, Poetry, Rumi, Senses | No Comments »

Dance like Rumi, sing like Kabir

What was the true purpose of the masters of old? Were the saints, sages, mystics and masters merely here to model how to live a holy life? To tantalize us with their descriptions of the “other side”? Or were they revealing to their followers the holiest of holies, the exquisitely beautiful and powerful source of life and love itself, the kingdom of heaven already within, to be enjoyed any moment they chose?

What was it that made Rumi dance? What made Kabir laugh? What gave Jesus the love to say, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do,” even as he was hanging on a cross? What gave Socrates his wit and wisdom? What gave the Buddha so much joy?

What is the full potential of your life here and now in this moment and every moment? Can you too have a direct connection to the divine light and love that the masters knew? Can you too access the profound wisdom that gave them the ability to love as they did?

Knowledge of the Lord is your birthright. The pure in heart shall see God. Once you decide you sincerely want it, Knowledge is available to you. Read the book and allow your thirst to develop.

With the ability to see and hear and feel what the scriptures praise, your current religion may grow in even more meaning and depth for you. Knowledge will provide you with a lifetime of inspiration.


Posted: June 28th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Buddha, Happiness, Heaven, Jesus, Joy, Kabir, Kingdom, Knowledge, Krishna, Light, Love, Rumi, Senses, Socrates | No Comments »

You have two sets of senses

My heart has five other senses of its own.
Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi

You have five outer senses with which you navigate the physical world — sight, sound, smell, taste and touch — and you have inner senses that correlate to the outer.

The pleasures of the outer world are limited, because all things physical, mental and emotional have limits. You can only eat so much ice cream and cake or pretzels and beer before you get sick. No matter how hard you try to squeeze happiness out of this world, it’s temporary. People, places and things come and go in time. Our tenuous hold on physical goodness results in fear, insecurity, stress, tension and dis-ease.

The pleasures of the inner realm, on the other hand, have no limits and no adverse side effects. When you turn your awareness inward, you find the love, joy, fulfillment and security you have always longed for. You may enjoy these non-physical pleasures to your heart’s content whenever you wish. The inner realm is always there. It never goes away. It honors your autonomy. You can choose it in this moment, or not. It will never punish you nor will it leave you. You can ignore it but you cannot lose it. Knowing this level of safety and security, you can relax deeply and breathe fully and freely. Health automatically returns.

In you is the purest and most dependable pleasure possible. When you enjoy your inner senses, you become content and peaceful.

Those who see themselves as whole make no demands.
ACIM Workbook Lesson 37


Posted: June 28th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Chapters, Joy, Love, Rumi, Senses | No Comments »